Voices of Women of Utah – St George News

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Miriam Tribe is one of several Utah women artists whose work is featured in the “Rouge: Utah Women’s Voices” exhibit at the Dixie State University Sears Art Museum from June 11 to September 17. The exhibition will open with an artists’ round table at 6 pm immediately followed by an opening reception, location and date undetermined | Photo courtesy of Dixie State University, St. George News

ST. GEORGE –Shedding light on what it’s like to be a woman artist in Utah, the ‘Rouge: Utah Women’s Voices’ exhibit will be on display at the Sears Art Museum at Dixie State University after it opens Friday night with a table round of artists.

Katie Rojas is one of several Utah women artists whose work is featured in the “Rouge: Utah Women’s Voices” exhibit at the Dixie State University Sears Art Museum from June 11 to September 17. The exhibition will open with a round table of artists at 6 pm immediately followed by a vernissage on Friday June 11, place and date not specified | Photo courtesy of Dixie State University, St. George News

The exhibition opens Friday with the artist’s panel discussion at 6 p.m. in the art museum, located in the Dolores Doré Eccles Fine Arts Center on the campus of Dixie State University, according to a statement from press published by the university. Immediately after the discussion, an opening reception will take place until 8:30 pm The exhibition will be on display until September 17th. The art museum is open Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and admission is free for the exhibition and opening events.

“’Red: Utah Women’s Voices’ is a small representation of Utah’s large number of female artists; However, it is a good representation of the diversity of women artists in Utah, ”said Kathy Cieslewicz, director and curator of DSU Sears Art Museum, in the press release. “The exhibition reflects the imbalance of women’s art in museums and encourages patrons to think about what can be done to address this issue.”

Artists featured in “Rouge: Utah Women’s Voices” were invited to create works of art that express what it is like to be in their place as a female artist in Utah, where 60% of artists are women but 70% of the artists exhibited are men.

Nancy Audruk Olson, an artist from Utah and curator of the exhibition, said in the statement that the purpose of the ‘Rouge’ exhibition is to highlight the disparity in exhibition opportunities between men and women in the arts by discussing the many roles of women artists in Utah.

“This is an inspiring exhibition that draws attention to the many issues facing women in the arts today,” said Olson.

Miriam Tribe is one of several Utah women artists whose work is featured in the “Rouge: Utah Women’s Voices” exhibit at the Dixie State University Sears Art Museum from June 11 to September 17. The exhibition will open with an artists’ round table at 6 pm immediately followed by an opening reception, location and date undetermined | Photo courtesy of Dixie State University, St. George News

A wide range of perspectives are represented in the exhibit, highlighting the importance of the work of Utah women artists. A nod to the contemporary feminine movement, each artist incorporates the common thread of pink into their work.

“In order to present interesting, educational and unique experiences, this exhibition continues the tradition.

Cieslewicz said customers will be impressed and intrigued by the artwork. For a work of art, a Cessna 150 was brought to the museum.

“Come and sit in the cockpit and check the QR codes to reveal the inner meaning of the gauges and even bullet holes,” she said.

In addition to this exhibition, three women artists are presented in the Grand Foyer Eccles – “Landscapes on Yupo” by Mel Scott and Diane Asay and watercolors by Loretta Clayson.

To learn more about “Red: Utah Women’s Voices” and the Sears Art Museum at Dixie State University, visit www.searsart.com.

Copyright St. George News, SaintGeorgeUtah.com LLC, 2021, all rights reserved.



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